LATEST UPDATES

Bunker Hill
Housing Redevelopment

A plan to serve the community's needs.

Our Vision

The Bunker Hill Housing Redevelopment project, formerly One Charlestown, aims to create a vibrant, new mixed-income – market rate and deeply affordable – residential community for all Charlestown residents and that pays homage to Charlestown’s local history.

Built in 1940 as federal public housing, the Bunker Hill Housing development is severely depreciated with many buildings in disrepair due to lack of federal funding. Through a public-private partnership with the City of Boston, the existing 46 buildings will be replaced with 16 new residential buildings, retail and community space, as well as green spaces and connections to the surrounding Charlestown neighborhood. 

Our team appreciates the many neighborhood residents who attended the community meetings as we continue our planning, and we look forward to working together to make Charlestown an even better home for all members of our community.

Community Engagement

After hearing community input and suggestions, the expanded development team of Joseph J. Corcocan Co. and Leggat McCall Properties, in partnership with the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the Charlestown Resident Alliance (CRA), has prepared a revised conceptual plan with a significant reduction in overall height and density. Primary changes since 2016 include lower building heights and a reduction of 500 units. This brings the total unit count down to 2,699 mixed-income apartments - which will include 1,010 deeply affordable replacement units on site. Since our May community meetings, the first building to be constructed has also been revised to be mixed-income (a combination of market-rate and deeply affordable units).
Since the May 2019 public meeting, our team has held several additional public meetings and workshops to solicit input on several topics, including site planning, traffic/parking, construction impacts and mitigation, retail strategy, and exterior design of the first buildings. These were held in addition to the standard public meetings that are part of the official Article 80 public process, which is set to resume in September 2020.
2016 Plan
UNITS
3,200
Mixed Income Housing
INCLUDING
1,100
Deeply Affordable Units
STORIES
22 max
2019 Plan
UNITS
2,699
Mixed Income Housing
INCLUDING
1,010
Deeply Affordable Units
STORIES
10 max
Lower height buildings along Bunker Hill St and Medford St
life preserver
Replacement of Deeply Affordable Units
The redevelopment will replace 1,010 affordable units on site and BHA will replace the remaining 100 affordable units at an off-site location in Charlestown.  There will be no loss of deeply affordable units.
architects' tools
Thoughtful Design
All units and buildings in the redevelopment will be designed and built to the same high-quality standards and include the same amenities.
trees
New Community Parks
Public parks nearly the size of two football fields will bring additional trees, lush landscaping, and open space to the neighborhood. These spaces will create a new public square and recreational amenities for all ages and abilities. 
map pins and a path
Enhanced Connectivity
New sidewalks and landscape design will create better connections between the development and the neighborhood. The site design will also strengthen the connections to the Navy Yard and Bunker Hill Monument.
shopping cart
Ground-floor Retail
Neighborhood amenities and new retail along Bunker Hill Street will focus on local needs and businesses.
Honor Local History
The redevelopment will seek thoughtful ways to pay homage to Charlestown’s unique local history.

Latest Updates

October 28, 2020: Impact Advisory Group (IAG) Meeting

October 21, 2020: Public Meeting

October 21, 2020: Information for IAG and Public Meetings

The documents provided here contain supplemental information about the proposed project that has been discussed at IAG and public meetings.

October 14, 2020: Impact Advisory Group (IAG) Meeting

October 12, 2020: Information for IAG and Public Meetings

The documents provided here contain supplemental information about the proposed project as well as relevant sections of our DEIR/DPIR and FEIR that have been discussed at IAG and public meetings.

October 6, 2020: BCDC Monthly Meeting Presentation

September 30, 2020: Impact Advisory Group (IAG) Meeting

September 16, 2020: Impact Advisory Group (IAG) Meeting

September 9, 2020: Public Meeting

May 2020 Video Presentation:

This video will not replace the full and thorough in-person community input and permitting process which has paused and will resume at a later date to be set by the City. When this occurs, we are committed to taking no shortcuts and will reschedule workshops and meetings as soon as we are able to meet again. We will continue to be engaged and working in earnest in our planning efforts.

Transcript

Presentación en español:

Transcripción

視訊更新演示記錄

March 2020:

Early 2020:

February 18, 2020:

December 2, 2019:

Updates announced at Nov. 20, 2019 Meeting:

Construction Projected to Start Mid-2021

Sign up for our mailing list and check back at this website for up to date information and additional details on future public meetings.

FAQs

How many buildings will be demolished and how many new buildings will there be?

There are currently 42 buildings on the site that will be demolished and replaced with 16 new buildings.

How many units are being demolished?

There are currently 1,110 units on the site that will be demolished.

How many new units will be on the site?

2,699 (including 1,010 deeply affordable units and 1,689 market-rate units).

There were originally 1,110 deeply affordable units on site. Are we losing 100 units?

There will be no loss of deeply affordable units. The BHA will replace the other 100 deeply affordable units off-site at another location in Charlestown.

What type of units will be on the site?

All of the units will be rental apartments.

What size units will be in the buildings?

For the market-rate units, it will be a mix of studios, one, two, and three bedrooms. Deeply affordable units will be a mix of one, two, three, and four bedrooms.

What is the max building height?

10 stories, with such buildings located near the Tobin Bridge and the center of the site.

How tall will buildings be along Bunker Hill and Medford Streets?

Along Bunker Hill Street, buildings will be 4 stories. Along Medford Street buildings will be 4 stories across from residential areas, and up to 6 stories across from the high school playing fields.

How many parks will there be?

There are several areas throughout the site that will be open to the public. There are two areas in particular that will be larger and feature more amenities. Altogether, the publicly accessible recreational spaces on the site are nearly the size of two football fields.

How much retail space will there be?

There will be 70,000 SF of community and retail space.

Will there be a community center on the site?

Yes, there will be a community center. The location has not yet been determined.

How much parking will be added to the site to support the additional units?

We do not yet know the exact number of parking spots that will be added. This will be determined through the Article 80 process with feedback from the community.

When will you resume Article 80 Process?

The Article 80 process for the overall zoning and the first phase resumed after we filed our Draft Project Impact Report (DPIR) on February 18, 2020. The public process was paused due to COVID-19, but is set to resume on September 9, 2020. Each subsequent phase will also be taken through an Article 80 process.

What is a MEPA Phase One waiver and why did the developer request this in the DEIR/DPIR?

The Phase one waiver is for the state MEPA (Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act) process, not the city process. We are able to request this because as a standalone project the first phase of the Bunker Hill Housing Redevelopment (the first two buildings) would not exceed mandatory environmental requirements to be subject to MEPA review. Our purpose in requesting this waiver is that it enables us to start construction for the first phase only before the MEPA FEIR (Final Environment Impact Report/state) is completed for the overall site plan.

We have not requested any kind of waiver from the BPDA and there is no change in the BPDA Article 80 public process for the overall site plan or the first phase. Construction is still planned to start this Fall.

When will construction start?

Construction is projected to start early 2021.

If I am an existing BHA resident, how far in advance will I find out I am moving?

You will be notified 9 months to a year in advance of when you will move out of your current apartment. At that time, a relocation specialist will work with you to identify the best options for your family.  The redevelopment team will maximize the ability to provide on-site, one-way moves for residents.

Residents in Phase 1A can click here.

If I am an existing BHA resident, who do I contact for questions about relocation?

Boston Housing Authority has hired a relocation specialist to handle this process. They will reach out to you at the appropriate time. In the meantime, you can reach out to BHA staff, Amy Tran at 617-988-4316 with questions.

Will everyone living in existing deeply affordable units be able to return to the site?

Yes, everyone who currently lives in the development and wants to return will be able to.

Who will own the land after it is redeveloped?

The land will remain under Boston Housing Authority (BHA) ownership, with each building developed as a privately-owned building subject to a 99-year ground lease with the BHA.. Affordable units will remain affordable under the ground-lease.

Who will manage the buildings?

The new buildings will be managed by a management company hired by the developer with input from the BHA and CRA.

Existing buildings will continue to be managed by the BHA until demolished.

Why is this a public-private partnership?

Due to a lack of sufficient federal capital funding to upgrade and preserve the development, the BHA entered into a partnership with a private development team (Corcoran/LMP) to redevelop the property to ensure the long-term preservation of the site.

What types of buildings are included in this development?

There are both mixed-income buildings (market-rate and deeply affordable units) and all affordable buildings in the development.

  • There are no 100% market-rate buildings.
  • The unit mix in the mixed-income buildings is currently 78% market-rate and 22% deeply affordable.

The unit mix in the overall development is 63% market-rate and 37% deeply affordable.

How many buildings will be demolished and how many new buildings will there be?

There are currently 42 buildings on the site that will be demolished and replaced with 16 new buildings.

How many units are being demolished?

There are currently 1,110 units on the site that will be demolished in phases over the course of the project.

How many new units will be on the site?

2,699 units will be built on site - including 1,010 deeply affordable replacement units and 1,689 market-rate units.

There were originally 1,110 deeply affordable units on site. Are we losing 100 units?

No, the BHA has announced that they are replacing the other 100 deeply affordable units off-site at another location in Charlestown so there will be no loss of any deeply affordable units in Charlestown.

What type of units will be on the site?

All of the units will be rental apartments, with a mix of market-rate and deeply affordable units.

What size units will be in the buildings?

For the market-rate units, it will be a mix of studios, one, two, and three bedrooms. Deeply affordable units will be a mix of one, two, three, and four bedrooms.

What is the max building height?

The maximum building height will be 10 stories, with those buildings located near the Tobin Bridge and the center of the site.

How tall will buildings be along Bunker Hill and Medford Streets?

Along Bunker Hill Street, buildings will be 4 stories. Along Medford Street buildings will be 4 stories across from residential areas, and up to 6 stories across from the high school playing fields.

How many parks will there be?

Our plan calls for a total of 7 acres of open space, of which 2. 7 acres will be designated for publicly accessible open space concentrated in four large-format areas throughout the site. Altogether, the publicly accessible open spaces on the site will be more than the size of two football fields. We will work closely with the community to design and program these park-type spaces.

What is happening to the mature trees on the site?

Preserving these trees is a priority to the design and development teams. As part of the overall Master Plan effort, we have engaged an Arborist to provide an independent survey and accounting of the Bunker Hill trees. This work will provide three important resources. First, the detailed survey will allow us to accurately locate each tree on site and to work with the Architecture and Civil Engineering teams to identify trees which are “most preservable” early in the design process. This evaluation will take into account factors such as the location of the tree within the proposed master plan; adjacency to built environment changes which would affect light levels and root extents; and proposed grading changes.  

The second major resource is an evaluation of the current health of the existing trees. Like the current housing stock, many of the trees date to the original development in the early1940s and have not have the benefit of sustained maintenance throughout the decades. The Arborist’s assessment will give the design team tools to identify which trees might be expected to thrive for years to come and which are nearing the end of their natural lifespan. With this knowledge, the design team can prioritize the preservation of our healthiest trees and allow them to serve as the foundation for a new urban forestry experience.

Finally, the Arborist’s report will identify the current level of species diversity. Species diversity is an incredibly important factor in planning for climate and ecological resiliency. Providing a wide variety of individual tree species protects the urban forest from depletion as a result of disease, invasive pest or inability to adapt to radical climate shifts. Species diversity also provides habitat resources to a wider array of urban wildlife, birds and insect communities. In understanding the current plant community, the design team will be able to develop a proposed tree palette which acknowledges the current species range and provides a wider range of supplemental species in the form of new trees. This expansion of species diversity will continue beyond the trees and include a broad selection of native/adaptive shrubs and perennials – replacing the current landscape largely dominated by yews and grass.

This report will be shared when the Arborist has completed the survey.

How much retail space will there be?

There will be 70,000 SF of community and retail space.

Will there be a community center on the site?

Yes, there will be a community center. The location has not yet been determined.

How much parking will be added to the site to support the additional units?

We do not yet know the exact number of parking spots that will be added. This will be determined through the Article 80 process with feedback from the community.

When will you resume Article 80 Process?

We officially resumed our Article 80 process after we filed our Draft Project Impact Report (DPIR) on February 18, 2020. However, the public process was paused, and public meetings were postponed in March due to COVID-19. We resumed that public process with our first BPDA public meeting on September 9, 2020, to be followed by additional IAG and public meetings for full public review. Subsequent phases will also be taken through a full Article 80 process.

What is a MEPA Phase 1 waiver and why did the developer request this in the DEIR/DPIR?

The Phase 1 waiver is for the state MEPA (Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act) process, not the city process. We are able to request this because as a standalone project the first phase of the Bunker Hill Housing Redevelopment (the first two buildings) would not exceed mandatory environmental requirements to be subject to MEPA review. Our purpose in requesting this waiver is that it enables us to start construction for the first phase only before the MEPA FEIR (Final Environment Impact Report/state) is completed for the overall site plan.

This is an administrative measure that does not impact the City public review process in any way and does not change our commitment to building all buildings using Passive House design – the highest environmental efficiency standard in the world for greenhouse gas emissions reductions and sustainability for residential buildings. The environmental impact report, required by MEPA, will cover the entire development area, including the two buildings in Phase 1. We will not proceed with subsequent phases until the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) is approved for the entire site.

We have not requested any kind of waiver from the BPDA and there is no change in the BPDA Article 80 public process for the overall site plan or the first phase.

Statement from BPDA: The MEPA process is a state process, and separate from the BPDA’s Article 80 review. The BPDA is fully committed to conducting a full Article 80 review process for the Bunker Hill Housing Redevelopment proposal, including the public review of Phase 1 and all future phases. The comment period for the project is open until May 11, and we encourage the public to continue to share their feedback on the proposed project.

Does the MEPA Phase 1 waiver affect the Article 80 process?

No. The Phase 1 waiver does not affect the Article 80 process. The MEPA process is a state process and separate from the BPDA’s Article 80 review. The BPDA is fully committed to conducting a full Article 80 review process for the Bunker Hill Housing Redevelopment proposal, including the public review of Phase 1 and all future phases.

Given the delays due to COVID-19, why do you need the MEPA Phase 1 waiver?

Due to the delays associated with COVID-19, the MEPA Phase 1 waiver is no longer relevant. We submitted our Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) to MEPA in July 2020 and have now received our final MEPA certificate for the entire site, including Phase 1.

Prior to COVID we sought a waiver because of timing considerations.  We wanted to be sure that the project could start as soon as the Article 80process was complete.   We continued to engage with the MEPA office regularly since the City public process was paused in March and have now completed the full MEPA review process.

When will you complete the MEPA process for the entire site?

We submitted our Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) to MEPA in July 2020 and have now received our final MEPA certificate for the entire site, including Phase 1.

Prior to COVID we sought a waiver because of timing considerations.  We wanted to be sure that the project could start as soon as the Article 80 process was complete. We continued to engage with the MEPA office regularly since the City public process was paused in March and have now completed the full MEPA review process.

When will construction start?

Site preparation and demolition is projected to start mid-2021 for the first two buildings (Building F and Building M).

If I am an existing BHA resident, how far in advance will I find out I am moving?

You will be notified 9 months to a year in advance of when you will move out of your current apartment. At that time, a relocation specialist will work with you to identify the best options for your family. The redevelopment team will maximize the ability to provide on-site, one-way moves for residents. Residents in Phase 1A can click here for more information about relocation.

If I am an existing BHA resident, who do I contact for questions about relocation?

Boston Housing Authority has hired a relocation specialist to handle this process. They will reach out to you at the appropriate time. In the meantime, you can reach out to BHA staff, Amy Tran at 617-988-4316 with questions.

Will everyone living in existing deeply affordable units be able to return to the site?

Yes, everyone who currently lives in the development and wants to return will be able to.

Who will own the land after it is redeveloped?

The land will remain under Boston Housing Authority (BHA) ownership, with each building developed as a privately-owned building subject to a 99-year ground lease with the BHA. Affordable units will remain affordable under the ground-lease.

Who will manage the buildings?

The new buildings will be managed by a management company hired by the developer with input from the BHA and CRA. Existing buildings will continue to be managed by the BHA until demolished.

Why is this a public-private partnership?

Due to a lack of sufficient federal capital funding to upgrade and preserve the development, the BHA entered into a partnership with a private development team (Corcoran/LMP) to redevelop the property to ensure the long-term preservation of the site.

What types of buildings are included in this development?

There are both mixed-income buildings (market-rate and deeply affordable units) and all affordable buildings in the development.

  • There are no 100% market-rate buildings.
  • The unit mix in the mixed-income buildings is currently 78% market-rate and 22% deeply affordable.
  • The unit mix in the overall development is 63% market-rate and 37% deeply affordable.